Wednesday, 10 October 2018

#ReadingWomen - October 2018

Welcome to ReadingWomen! You can find out what inspired the series by Visiting This Link. The idea is to promote books authored by women and I have got another superb quintet here to whet your literary appetites.

Feel welcome to Comment your own book suggestions, especially links to your own reviews for the Around The Blogosphere choice. I love to see what everybody else is reading!

Inspirational biography

A biography or autobiography written by a woman and about a woman:

Slave by Mende Nazer

The Book Depository
Wordery
Waterstones
Amazon US / Amazon UK

'Mende Nazer tells the story of her kidnap, at age 12, from an idyllic life with her family in a village in Sudan, and being sold into slavery. Trafficked to Europe and the London home of a diplomat, Nazer escaped - only to find she had to fight for asylum.'



5 star favourite

A book to which I awarded 5/5 stars

Gulag 101 by Nico Reznick

The Book Depository
Wordery (unavailable)
Waterstones (unavailable)
Amazon US / Amazon UK

'Nico Reznick's second collection of poetry is an exploration of profoundly human themes, such as loss, desire, oppression and the search for meaning, calling upon a disparate array of muses, including Slovakian strippers, the Conservative Party and brain-damaged cat-gods. Reznick's style favours realness over beauty, directness over decoration. Sensitive while avoiding sentimentality, Reznick writes with a savage and soul-baring sincerity that cuts right to the bleeding, beating heart of the human condition.'



Dave's choice

My OH is almost a voracious a bookworm as me! He's also just as happy to read books written by women as by men which apparently is unusual for a man.

The Second Deadly Sin by Asa Larsson

The Book Depository
Wordery
Waterstones
Amazon US / Amazon UK

Dawn breaks in a forest in northern Sweden. Villagers gather to dispatch a rampaging bear. When the beast is brought to ground they are horrified to find the remains of a human hand inside its stomach.
In nearby Kiruna a woman is found murdered in her bed, her body a patchwork of vicious wounds, the word WHORE scrawled across the wall. Her grandson Marcus, already an orphan, is nowhere to be seen.
Grasping for clues, Rebecka Martinsson begins to delve into the victim's tragic family history. But with doubts over her mental health still lingering, she is ousted from the case by an arrogant and ambitious young prosecutor.
Before long a chance lead draws Martinsson back into the thick of the action and her legendary courage is put to the test once more.




On my bookshelf

A book I've bought, swapped or been gifted and am eagerly awaiting reading

Thalidomide Kid by Kate Rigby

The Book Depository
Wordery
Waterstones (unavailable)
Amazon US / Amazon UK

Daryl Wainwright is the quirky youngest child of a large family of petty thieves and criminals who calls himself ‘Thalidomide Kid’.

Celia Burkett is the new girl at the local primary school, and the daughter of the deputy head at the local comprehensive where she is bound the following September. With few friends, Celia soon becomes fascinated by ‘the boy with no arms’. 

The story is about the blossoming romance and sexual awakening between a lonely girl and a disabled boy, and their struggle against adversity and prejudice as they pass from primary to secondary school in 1970s Cirencester. The story deals with themes and issues that are timeless.


Around the blogosphere

A 5/5 star review from another bookish blog

The Dream Daughter by Diane Chamberlain


The Book Depository
Wordery
Waterstones
Amazon US / Amazon UK

When Carly Sears, a young woman widowed by the Vietnam War, receives the news that her unborn baby girl has a heart defect, she is devastated. It is 1970, and she is told that nothing can be done to help her child. But her brother-in-law, a physicist with a mysterious past, tells her that perhaps there is a way to save her baby. What he suggests is something that will shatter every preconceived notion that Carly has. Something that will require a kind of strength and courage she never knew existed. Something that will mean an unimaginable leap of faith on Carly’s part.

And all for the love of her unborn child.

The Dream Daughter is a rich, genre-spanning, breathtaking novel about one mother’s quest to save her child, unite her family, and believe in the unbelievable. Diane Chamberlain pushes the boundaries of faith and science to deliver a novel that you will never forget.


If you've read any of these, pop your thoughts and review links in the Comments. And your suggestions for other #ReadingWomen books are most welcome.

I blog my #Reading Women posts on the 10th of each month. Feel welcome to join in on any date! I've even made a badge to wear on your blog :-)




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8 comments:

  1. I read Slave years back when I was involved in bookcrossing. I was reading a lot of African and asian true stories at that time.

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    1. Nazer's is such a shocking story, even more so as it is far from unique

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  2. The Second Deadly Sin sounds really good.

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  3. The Second Deadly Sin sounds good. I do love a good mystery!!

    -Lauren
    www.shootingstarsmag.net

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    1. I've enjoyed two Larsson mysteries now and Dave has at least one more borrowable via our linked Amazon accounts so I'm looking forward to that one as well

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  4. I haven't but I read another Asa Larsson book a while back and enjoyed it...

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